The Science Behind Mobile Gaming Addiction

Everyone who loves playing games, is at some point at risk of being converted to a full fledged video game addict (although this may not be a very bad thing :)).

And those in the business of making games, always aim at owning atleast one title that can lead to such addiction.

Mobile games today is a multi-billion dollar industry where just 0.15% of the mobile gamers bring in 50% of the revenue. The paying customers are small but they can be attributed as video game addicts. But they are not the only ones. There are some persistent players who keep grinding through levels without making any purchases, and they can be just as guilty of being addicts.

What makes games so enticing? Well, the science of mobile game addiction has been explained with an infographic below. Read it to find more –

AddictiveGamingSource: Online-Psychology-Degrees.org

Number Guessing Game using CreateJS

I’ve created a simple “Guess the Number” game in which the objective of the player is to guess the random number selected by the computer within the least possible moves. I’ve used the CreateJS libraries to create the game.

The advantage of using the CreateJS library for game development is that it helps manage graphics on the Canvas in a way that is similar to the Adobe Flash display list. It helps maintain a cleaner work-flow and gradually introduces you to building complex games. This does not mean the other libraries are any lesser in performance or capabilities. I chose CreateJS because I’ve been working with it recently for app development.

The game has been created using CreateJS has been uploaded so that you can play it before attempting to code it. (Refresh the page incase the game doesn’t open)

The game code below primarily covers the most essential features required to learn basic game development using Canvas, HTML5 and CreateJS. This includes –

  • Drawing shapes on the canvas with a fill and outline
  • Creating text and changing the value of the text at runtime
  • Working with Mouse Events
  • Working with Containers (grouping graphics into one object).

To see the complete code including the HTML file, you can download it from this game link.

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The Ups and Downs of HTML5

I’ve been off writing for a while mostly because most my time had been taken up with work. If I did get any time off, I preferred spending that time away from the desk. But lately I’ve been missing writing, so thought of starting off with a short article on how I view the platform I’m investing my time in – HTML5.

Rewinding back by four years

It all began in April 2010 when the then CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs issued a public letter titled “Thoughts on Flash” dismissing it as platform no longer relevant for web based content. All of a sudden it sparked debates in the media and developer circles with HTML5 by being pitted against Flash, threatening to topple it down. The general opinion was that HTML5 is King and will change the way people look at content on mobile, as Flash will languish in oblivion.

As time passed, the glory of HTML5 starting fading a bit. In 2012 Mark Zuckerberg was quoted saying at the Disrupt conference that his biggest mistake was “betting too much on HTML5 as opposed to native”.

In 2013 LinkedIn too switched from mobile web-based apps to native because of performance issues and crashes.

In 2012 at the Intel Developer Forum, Intel admitted that HTML5 was over hyped, while continuing to be a strong developer supporter for HTML5 development even today.

HTML5 games was a small, almost non-existent market.

Back to recent times

Times are better today. There is still a constant conflicting debate on whether HTML5 is sustainable in comparison to native or platforms like Unity.

Native and web based apps can never be compared because they both work differently. While a native app runs on a mobile’s OS and machine firmware, HTML5 apps run within a browser. It is upto project stakeholders to decide whether their product is best designed for native or web.

SpilGames and SoftGames have the largest catalogue of casual HTML5 games. They have built this catalogue to target their casual game audiences that play games on the web. They along with FGL are encouraging developers with an ecosystem that includes monetization across platforms. Amazon too has started excepting HTML5 web apps.

GREE, a Japanese social games company recently announced a shift of focus from HTML5 to native apps. I don’t see this as a news that will damage the current HTML5 ecosystem. It is known that HTML5 can never compete with console quality games, especially on mobiles. What HTML5 can provide though, is quick access to games when a user visits a website without having the pains of connecting to app stores, downloading content or paying for it. HTML5 is best suited for quick game-plays and easy discovery through web browsers.

What I also loving about the platform is its community. The community is responsive and constantly building and improving frameworks to make the process of HTML5 development easier.

So to sum it up, the adaption of HTML5 has been like a wave curve. It’s seen adaption and  abandonment. The platform is yet evolving, and it’s only going to get better, while mobile phones will get more powerful.

If you have thoughts on the HTML5 ecosystem please feel free to share it. I to hope continue sharing more articles on developing games and apps using HTML5.

Also check out

Chrome experiments; they have some fantastic work but never tested them on mobiles

Mozilla Developer Network

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Adobe Playpanel shows the best in online gaming

Playpanel from Adobe is a desktop application that automatically bookmarks all the Flash games played in your browser. It is a perfect tool for online and social game players because it helps to discover new games and also see what others are playing.

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What’s convenient about the app is that it silently runs in the background capturing your gaming behaviour without you having to manually do anything. The app captures information such as the games you’ve played, the game links, publisher information, the date you last played the games, number of times you played them etc.

The app is also browser independant, so you could be playing a game in any browser and it will automatically make it available in your Playpanel game list. I tried it with Google Chrome, Firefox and IE and it worked fine.

Playpanel requires you to login with either your Facebook login or Adobe login. I think this login compulsion could have been avoided because not everyone is comfortable inputting their login details. But then looking at it from a product perspective, it also needs to reach out to a wide audience through Facebook invites and virality through game sharing, so it can’t be avoided.

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The feature I like most is the discovery of new games from the “Discover Games” tab. This list contains high quality games from well-known publishers. The games are divided into Featured games and Popular games. The featured games are hand picked by the game editors while the Popular games are chosen based on their ratings by other players. You too can rate/comment on these games or see what others have commented about it before you start playing it.

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A feature called “Pinning” games helps to pin games which are then made available to your Facebook friends. You can also see what games your friends have pinned, thus collaborating with them on a multiplayer or social game mission.

It almost feels like Playpanel is like a mobile app store, the only difference being, the games are free and played in a desktop browser. Also, with so much gaming content out there it is almost impossible to know what to play or not to play. An app like Playpanel just makes it easier to identify good content.

However, it’ll be interesting to know how much further this product will evolve. One feature that I can think of is arranging games according to genres. Another is showing “similar games” thumbnails on a particular game details page. Also, it will be nice to have the game details page show whether the game is cross-platform.

With Adobe focusing heaviliy on HTML5, will it also serve as a future platform for those games? Just a food for thought!

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