HTML5 Game with EaselJS and TweenJS

HTML5 has been a subject of interest and discussion for many developers. I was intrigued by the platform myself and decided to explore it with a simple game of Concentration to understand how easy or difficult it is to plan a project that requires these new web standards. I used the Canvas element with the EaselJS Library and the TweenJS Library for development.

http://mariamdholkawala.com/games/concentration/gameconc.html

Working with the Canvas
When developing games with HTML5, one of the most crucial elements is the Canvas. The Canvas is like a blank slate on which graphics can be drawn using Javascript. The Canvas element is always added to the HTML page with an id reference for use in Javascript. However a canvas can also be created dynamically using JQuery.

Once the canvas is ready for use, we can combine it with libraries such as EaselJS to draw graphics or text. EaselJS has object properties very similar to Actionscript thus offering a more familiar ground to Flash developers.

HTML (set the Canvas):
<canvas id="myCanvas" width="550" height="400"></canvas>

Javascript (loading an image on the Canvas):
var canvas = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
var img=new Image();
img.src="graphics/title.png";
img.onload = function(){
ctx.drawImage(img,0,0);
}

Javascript (using EaselJS to load image on Canvas):
var canvas = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var stage = new Stage(canvas);
var img=new Image();
img.src="graphics/title.png";
img.onload = function(e){
var title = new Bitmap(e.target);
stage.addChild(title);
stage.update();
}

<div> tag verses <img> tag verses Canvas
There was a constant decision to be made on what is the best approach for loading graphics. The choice was mostly between the <div> tag, the <img> tag and the HTML5 Image element. I personally observed that all seem efficient to use, but preferred using the HTML5 Image element for in-game graphics because they could be manipulated dynamically much easily. The <div> and <img> tags seemed suitable for the static background and other UI elements which needed design effects with CSS.

HTML (adding a div tag and loading image in the div using CSS):

<div id = "btn"></div>
<canvas id="myCanvas" width="550" height="400"></canvas>

<style>
#btn{
background:url('graphics/playbtn.jpg') no-repeat center;
}
</style>

Mouse Events
Mouse Events and Touch Events are necessary to make any game interactive. With HTML5 too, they can be applied to individual graphical elements or to the complete canvas. Some of the useful events for games are onLoad, onMouseOver, onMouseOut, onClick.

In the Concentration game, I used click events for independent HTML5 elements like button images. I also applied a click event to the complete in-game canvas. This is because, during the game-play, the card placement changes with every level. Each card has a property which is best identified by comparing the mouseclick X and Y properties with the card’s X & Y properties.

Javascript (adding a Click Event to the whole canvas):
canvas.addEventListener("mouseup", mouseUp, false);
or
canvas.onclick = mouseUp;

Javascript (adding a Click event to a graphic using EaselJS):
image.onClick = mouseUp;

Javascript (mouseUp event)
function mouseUp(e){
var mx;
var my;
if(e.layerX >= 0 || e.layerY >= 0){
mx = e.layerX;
my = e.layerY;
}else if(e.offsetX >= 0 || e.offsetY >= 0){
mx = e.offsetX;
my = e.offsetY;
}

for(i = 0; i<deck.length; i++){
var card = deck[i];
if((mx > card.xpos && mx < card.xpos + cardWidth) && (my > card.ypos && my < card.ypos + cardHeight)){
//card clicked
}}}

Working with Different Screen Sizes
Supporting different browsers and devices is touted as one of the biggest plus points of HTML5. This means we should be able to customize our content to detect different screens and render the code accordingly. However this is not as easy as it seems, especially for games. There are several challenges in supporting the game on different browsers and device screens.

I remember reading an article on Adobe Developer Connection on working with HTML5 and CSS3 with Dreamweaver but it seemed more apt for app development not suiting my purpose of fluid dynamic screens for games. I did some testing with my game code and managed to achieve a common graphic database for some in-game elements. The current game that I developed, detects the browser and resizes in-game graphics after identifying the device (although there is scope for improvement).

Using TweenJS for transitions and animations
Very good transitions and animations are easily achievable using CSS3, but the TweenJS library makes it much easier to work with animations, especially if you have used the EaselJS Library for the rest of the game. I have used the fade-in fade-out transition for the cards in the Concentration game.

The code below simply fades an image to 0 alpha within 400 milliseconds without a loop. The detailed use of the TweenJS library can be found online.

Tween.get(imageToTween,{loop:false}) .to({alpha:0},400,Ease.get(1))

There are many resources available to understand game development with HTML5. I found the development interesting and hope to discover better development techniques as I work with this code. For seasoned Flash game developers, it may feel like a little let down, but giving in to the HTML5 hype can keep the motivation up.

http://mariamdholkawala.com/games/concentration/gameconc.html

This game should load in all browsers supporting HTML5 (IE gives weird results, not tested on Safari). The game should also run on device browsers but may not give a great experience because it is not ready for devices.

I’ll share the code when it is ready.

UPDATE: The game source files can be downloaded from ConcentrationGame.zip (1.24MB)

Mariam

5 thoughts on “HTML5 Game with EaselJS and TweenJS”

  1. Very neat sample game, I can’t believe I haven’t seen this one :) must have slipped under my radar. Might be a good idea to update source to use the new versions of the libraries ? for instance to new namespace, and take advantage of the new event model… just a thought :)

    Again nice work!

    -Sebastian

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